Tag Archives: NYC

GOTHAMEDIA panel discussion: Is print dead?

7 Nov

I’ve been blogging a lot lately, but I was a journalist first! I’ve written for several newspapers in NY and my college state, Delaware. So I really enjoyed hearing some big personalities from the industry battle this one out. Of course, I think both print and digital are valuable to readers – I read hard copies of magazines and books and I also find news on the Internet. But the bigger question is whether they are valuable from an economic standpoint.

Is print dead? A group of experienced media professionals tried to answer this question at a Gotham Media event at the Frankfurt Kurnit Klein + Selz PC law office last week. They agree print advertising revenue is declining, but the industry is still alive. The more contentious point was how to sustain the traditional magazine and newspaper industries.

It’s difficult to get a good sense of the pulse of these businesses. The magazine industry is at a 1.5 billion gross audience as of September 2014, up from 1.3 billion last year, according to the Association of Magazine Media. Martin Nisenholtz, founder of New York Times Digital, said their audience has expanded internationally.

The rise in numbers results from a larger digital audience. Mobile web use has risen 90% and more users are watching video and reading magazine digital editions.

With the movement toward digital, companies are trying to figure out the economics of their industry. According to Jonathan Knee, Senior Advisor at Evercore Partners and Co-Director at Columbia University School of Business’ Media Program, newspapers have 20% margins, which is good, but not as good as the glory days of 40% margins. It’s no longer enough to completely satisfy Wall Street.

Many longtime companies think the solution is to split up print and digital. Publicly traded companies Tribune Co., EW Scripps, Gannett and Journal Communications all had some type of division in the past few months.

Read the rest at Office Lease Center’s blog: http://bit.ly/1EbBwqK

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Disruptive Technologists: NYC is (pretty) good for startups

5 Nov

Disruptive Technologists hosted a panel, “NYC Social Infrastructure & Tech Ecosystem: Are we at an inflection point?” at the NY Institute of Technology on October 27, 2014. Panelists talked about how society has shifted from discouraging entrepreneurs to embracing them and what still needs to change to support this type of economy.

There are now more than 15,000 startups in NYC, making it the #1 ecosystem for entrepreneurs, said David Rose, CEO of Gust. With countless resources, a receptive city and a mix of enthusiastic entrepreneurs, it’s a good time to create a startup in New York.

Gone are the days when smart professionals dreamt of being Wall Street bankers, said moderator Bruce Bachenheimer, Director of Pace’s Entrepreneurship Lab. Hustling to start your own company is the new “sexy.” People want The Social Network-type success rather than Bonfire of the Vanities excess.

The city has a cross-pollination of ideas, free events, webinars, incubators, accelerators, encouragement from the government, and more students than the population of Boston, said Rose. These factors make starting a business here more desirable than joining one.

Rose has seen the landscape change firsthand. Having started NY Angels, one of the longest running angel groups, he remembers when people wanted to work at traditional Fortune 500 companies. Only 47 companies that made the original Fortune list have remained. Today, firms less than four years old and smaller than 100 employees have taken the others’ spots.

This is partly because large businesses that succeeded in the 20th century aren’t cut out for the 21st century, said Rose. They need to reinvent themselves. The airline industry is one example – several airlines have gone bankrupt in the past decade.

With entrepreneurs’ eager to disrupt, some industries have reason to worry. Uber is taking on ubiquitous yellow taxis. AirBnB is making a go at the multi-billion-dollar hotel industry by empowering regular people to dictate the market.

Read the rest at Office Lease Center’s blog: http://bit.ly/1rBqgeo

[VIDEO] The writer becomes the pitcher – I try pitching

23 Oct

Since I’ve been writing a lot about pitching and entrepreneurship, I figured it would be a good idea to try pitching for myself. Ok, well James Poots of NewYorkStartups gave me the idea – and the mic. He’s been recording people’s pitches and turning them into nice videos like the one below (see his Faccebook page here). After helping me perfect my pitch in Grand Central, moving locations when the Apple Store manager shooed us from the steps where we had been filming, and staying patient through several takes on the street, James put this together. On a side note, I kind of thought the Apple Store wouldn’t notice since this song about the Genius bar was recorded in an Apple Store: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MYSfbQi_5c.

Anyway, here is the video. At the very least, I think the graphics are really cool and my hair looks pretty good. (Speaking of hair, my second article was published at New Haircut, a creative digital agency!) If you like what I have to say, you know where to reach me. 🙂